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HEADLINES, Health
Reducing air pollution and meningitis risk in Africa.

Where there's smoke, there's disease? They're little more than a pile of burning sticks with a stew pot atop them, but these open fires or basic cook stoves have been linked to the premature deaths of 4 million people annually, many of them young children, writes Cheryl Dybas, of the National Science Foundation.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
A research team led by the University of Iowa has created the most detailed, three-dimensional rendering of a mammal lung.

Amidst the extraordinarily dense network of pathways in a mammal lung is a common destination. There, any road leads to a cul-de-sac of sorts called the pulmonary acinus. This place looks like a bunch of grapes attached to a stem (acinus means ‘berry’ in Latin), writes Richard C Lewis, University of Iowa.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Women with sleep apnea have higher degree of brain damage than men, UCLA study shows.

Women suffering from sleep apnea have, on the whole, a higher degree of brain damage than men with the disorder, according to a first-of-its-kind study conducted by researchers at the UCLA School of Nursing. The findings are reported in the December issue of the peer-reviewed journal SLEEP, writes UCLA’s Laura Perry.
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HEADLINES, Health
Feeling better? It doesn’t matter – take your medicine.

One of the most important health problems in the United States - and perhaps here in South Africa as well - is the failure of patients with chronic diseases to take their medications and do all that is necessary to control their illnesses, writes UCLA’s Enrique Rivero.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
UCLA infectious diseases doctor played key role in finance strategy for therapy.

A new international program, conceived in part by a UCLA physician, has rapidly transformed access to lifesaving anti-malarial drugs by providing cheap, subsidised artemisinin-based combination therapies in seven African countries that account for a quarter of the world's malaria cases, writes UCLA’s Rachel Champeau.
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HEADLINES, Health
Are e-cigarettes harmful to users? It’s an unresolved question.

It’s harder still to judge the danger to bystanders. How many different substances do e-smokers exhale – and what are they? A new study brings light to the shadows. Electronic cigarettes are experiencing somewhat of a boom at the moment. An estimated two million people in Germany have already turned to the vapour cigarette, which many view as a healthy alternative to conventional smoking.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Drug combination demonstrates a dramatic and clinically meaningful effect.

A combination therapy using an experimental new drug shows significant promise for women with a common type of breast cancer in which oestrogen causes their tumours to grow, researchers with the Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Centre report, writes UCLA's Shaun Mason.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Portable power supply allows patient to go home while he awaits new heart.

Imagine living without a heart. It is possible – if you have a new artificial heart pumping blood through your body. You can even go to the supermarket, watch your kid's soccer game or go on a hike. Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Centre has performed its first procedure to remove a patient's diseased heart and replace it with a SynCardia Temporary Total Artificial Heart, writes UCLA's Amy Albin.   Read More...




COMPANY NEWS , Health
- reduced Hospital waiting list for patients

The past weekend saw the end of the 2012 Saturday Surgeries initiative at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, to reduce the Hospital’s long waiting list for patients in need of life-changing surgical procedures. Mediclinic Southern Africa funded this R200 000 project, in partnership with the Children’s Hospital Trust, to provide an extra day of surgery on Saturdays over a 12 week period for elective procedures, which are not usually conducted over weekends.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Image: South Africa’s war against TB Yet again, SA holds a dubious distinction - this time for our TB incidence.
In 2010 South Africa had a tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate of 981 per 100,000 people. The only country with a higher rate was Swaziland at 1,287 per 100,000. The United Arab Emirates had the lowest rate at 3 per 100,000. This is according to an analysis of international TB data conducted by the South African Institute of Race Relations.   Read More...



ALL THE NEWS , Health
Who would have thought it... cooking our food may well have helped our brains develop.

New data support a theory that the invention of cooking triggered a great increase in human brain size, helping making us the intelligent species we are today. The ‘cooking made us human’ hypothesis has been championed by Harvard biological anthropologist Richard Wrangham, who argues that cooking provided such a nutritional boost that it increased brain size and freed up time for many other activities, such as hunting and social life.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Women with stable but not-so-sexy mates become more distant, critical during periods of high fertility.

Long after women have chosen Mr. Stable over Mr. Sexy, they struggle unconsciously with the decision, according to a new study by UCLA researchers who look at subtle changes in behaviour during ovulation. At their most fertile period, these women are less likely to feel close to their mates and more likely to find fault with them than women mated to more sexually desirable men, the research shows, writes UCLA's Meg Sullivan.
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HEADLINES, Health
New study: In vitro fertilization may significantly increase the risk of birth defects.

UCLA researchers presented findings from their abstract, ‘Congenital Malformations Associated With Assisted Reproductive Technology: A California Statewide Analysis,’ on 20 October at the American Academy of Paediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. In their study, they found that in vitro fertilization may significantly increase the risk of birth defects, particularly those of the eyes, heart, reproductive organs and urinary system, writes UCLA's Amy Albin.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Brain scans may reveal why some cannot be hypnotised.

A new study shows how the brains of such people differ from those who can easily be. Researchers found that in people who could not be hypnotised, brain cell networks associated with executive control on the one hand, and attention on the other showed less activity and less tendency to interconnect, in this article courtesy of Stanford University Medical Centre and World Science staff.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
These higher-quality images could allow breast tumours to be detected earlier and with much greater accuracy.

One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. But, like cleaning the lenses of a foggy pair of glasses, scientists are now able to use a technique developed by UCLA researchers and their European colleagues to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue that are two to three times sharper than those made using current CT scanners at hospitals. The technique also uses a lower dose of X-ray radiation than a mammogram, writes UCLA's Melody Pupols.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Image: Pilot Health Champions 1st phase complete

On Madiba Day Mamelani launched our Health Champions Programme to deepen the impact of our work in building healthier communities. A selection process identified “health champions” from the participants who have attended the Wellness Workshops in the last 2 years.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Using the properties of saliva could aid the diagnosis of dental conditions.

Scientists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have been at the vanguard of research on human saliva in recent years, leading the way in the dynamic, emerging field of salivary diagnostics, which seeks to catalogue the biological makeup of saliva to help screen for and detect both oral and systemic diseases, writes UCLA's Brianna Deane.
    Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
First of a two-part series exploring the scourge of tuberculosis and what researchers are doing about it.

Tuberculosis has been around long enough to earn many labels. Back in 18th and 19th century Europe it was characterised as ‘a romantic disease,’ given its high prevalence among artists and writers, but recent research has shown that the earliest trace of TB can be found in human remains from nearly 9 000 years ago. Yet, despite its long history and largely successful efforts at wiping the disease out in most Western countries, tuberculosis is still very much a problem in the developing world, writes Shraddha Chakradhar, HarvardMedical School.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
They've joined forces to fight a disease - and win... for themselves, for other patients too.

When sisters Melanie McWilliam and Lyndsay Winter were diagnosed with aggressive HER2-positive breast cancer within a year of each other, they knew they would need to fight with their all. Although they both knew that their risk of developing breast cancer was increased due to both their mother and their great-aunt having had the disease, it still came as a shock.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Most of the genes long thought to be linked to intelligence, simply are not.

This is what a new study has concluded. ‘We are not saying the people who did earlier research in this area were foolish,’ said Christopher Chabris, a psychological scientist at Union College in New York , who co-led the study. ‘They were using the best technology and information they had available,’ he says in this report courtesy of the Association for Psychological Science and World Science staff. Nor do Chabris and his colleagues deny that intelligence is hereditary and genetic....   Read More...



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