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ALL THE NEWS , Health
Portable power supply allows patient to go home while he awaits new heart.

Imagine living without a heart. It is possible – if you have a new artificial heart pumping blood through your body. You can even go to the supermarket, watch your kid's soccer game or go on a hike. Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Centre has performed its first procedure to remove a patient's diseased heart and replace it with a SynCardia Temporary Total Artificial Heart, writes UCLA's Amy Albin.   Read More...




COMPANY NEWS , Health
- reduced Hospital waiting list for patients

The past weekend saw the end of the 2012 Saturday Surgeries initiative at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, to reduce the Hospital’s long waiting list for patients in need of life-changing surgical procedures. Mediclinic Southern Africa funded this R200 000 project, in partnership with the Children’s Hospital Trust, to provide an extra day of surgery on Saturdays over a 12 week period for elective procedures, which are not usually conducted over weekends.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Image: South Africa’s war against TB Yet again, SA holds a dubious distinction - this time for our TB incidence.
In 2010 South Africa had a tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate of 981 per 100,000 people. The only country with a higher rate was Swaziland at 1,287 per 100,000. The United Arab Emirates had the lowest rate at 3 per 100,000. This is according to an analysis of international TB data conducted by the South African Institute of Race Relations.   Read More...



ALL THE NEWS , Health
Who would have thought it... cooking our food may well have helped our brains develop.

New data support a theory that the invention of cooking triggered a great increase in human brain size, helping making us the intelligent species we are today. The ‘cooking made us human’ hypothesis has been championed by Harvard biological anthropologist Richard Wrangham, who argues that cooking provided such a nutritional boost that it increased brain size and freed up time for many other activities, such as hunting and social life.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Women with stable but not-so-sexy mates become more distant, critical during periods of high fertility.

Long after women have chosen Mr. Stable over Mr. Sexy, they struggle unconsciously with the decision, according to a new study by UCLA researchers who look at subtle changes in behaviour during ovulation. At their most fertile period, these women are less likely to feel close to their mates and more likely to find fault with them than women mated to more sexually desirable men, the research shows, writes UCLA's Meg Sullivan.
    Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
New study: In vitro fertilization may significantly increase the risk of birth defects.

UCLA researchers presented findings from their abstract, ‘Congenital Malformations Associated With Assisted Reproductive Technology: A California Statewide Analysis,’ on 20 October at the American Academy of Paediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. In their study, they found that in vitro fertilization may significantly increase the risk of birth defects, particularly those of the eyes, heart, reproductive organs and urinary system, writes UCLA's Amy Albin.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Brain scans may reveal why some cannot be hypnotised.

A new study shows how the brains of such people differ from those who can easily be. Researchers found that in people who could not be hypnotised, brain cell networks associated with executive control on the one hand, and attention on the other showed less activity and less tendency to interconnect, in this article courtesy of Stanford University Medical Centre and World Science staff.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
These higher-quality images could allow breast tumours to be detected earlier and with much greater accuracy.

One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. But, like cleaning the lenses of a foggy pair of glasses, scientists are now able to use a technique developed by UCLA researchers and their European colleagues to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue that are two to three times sharper than those made using current CT scanners at hospitals. The technique also uses a lower dose of X-ray radiation than a mammogram, writes UCLA's Melody Pupols.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Image: Pilot Health Champions 1st phase complete

On Madiba Day Mamelani launched our Health Champions Programme to deepen the impact of our work in building healthier communities. A selection process identified “health champions” from the participants who have attended the Wellness Workshops in the last 2 years.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Using the properties of saliva could aid the diagnosis of dental conditions.

Scientists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have been at the vanguard of research on human saliva in recent years, leading the way in the dynamic, emerging field of salivary diagnostics, which seeks to catalogue the biological makeup of saliva to help screen for and detect both oral and systemic diseases, writes UCLA's Brianna Deane.
    Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
First of a two-part series exploring the scourge of tuberculosis and what researchers are doing about it.

Tuberculosis has been around long enough to earn many labels. Back in 18th and 19th century Europe it was characterised as ‘a romantic disease,’ given its high prevalence among artists and writers, but recent research has shown that the earliest trace of TB can be found in human remains from nearly 9 000 years ago. Yet, despite its long history and largely successful efforts at wiping the disease out in most Western countries, tuberculosis is still very much a problem in the developing world, writes Shraddha Chakradhar, HarvardMedical School.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
They've joined forces to fight a disease - and win... for themselves, for other patients too.

When sisters Melanie McWilliam and Lyndsay Winter were diagnosed with aggressive HER2-positive breast cancer within a year of each other, they knew they would need to fight with their all. Although they both knew that their risk of developing breast cancer was increased due to both their mother and their great-aunt having had the disease, it still came as a shock.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Most of the genes long thought to be linked to intelligence, simply are not.

This is what a new study has concluded. ‘We are not saying the people who did earlier research in this area were foolish,’ said Christopher Chabris, a psychological scientist at Union College in New York , who co-led the study. ‘They were using the best technology and information they had available,’ he says in this report courtesy of the Association for Psychological Science and World Science staff. Nor do Chabris and his colleagues deny that intelligence is hereditary and genetic....   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Research might be a new inroad into emotional disorders and disorders like tinnitus and migraine.

Nails screeching on a blackboard. A knife scraping against a bottle. These sounds are singularly annoying to many - but why? Heightened activity between the brain’s emotional and auditory parts is to blame, new research says in this article courtesy of Newcastle University and World Science staff.    Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Ground-breaking research finds bedsores are an important risk factor associated with mortality.

A new clinical study spearheaded by the dean of UCLA's School of Nursing has found a direct correlation between pressure ulcers - commonly known as bedsores - and patient mortality and increased hospitalisation, writes UCLA's Laura Perry. The research is believed to be the first of its kind to use data directly from medical records to assess the impact of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers on Medicare patients at national and state levels.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
A minty-fresh approach to testing those toothbrushes and toothpastes.

There are various types of toothpaste available on the market. They come as pastes and gels, there are some that guard against tooth decay or protect teeth from acid attack, others that are designed for sensitive teeth. But which toothpastes clean well? Which preserve the tooth enamel? A new evaluation method sheds light on the subject.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
FAS transcends all boundaries including race and class.

“15 October is National FAS Day and is an opportunity to once again highlight the incidence of Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in South Africa and the need for urgent, effective educational programmes to combat the problem.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
The Eastern Cape is in need of help to stem this condition – are you big enough to help?

Epilepsy has reached epidemic proportions in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa due to the prevalence of neurocysticercosis (NCC), or tapeworm infection (the number one cause of epilepsy in adults worldwide. Statistics 2004 shows 35,000 people in the Province with epilepsy due to NCC). Appeals to Authorities have not resulted in any solutions and the Health Sector is unable to intervene.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Good results achieved in study involving 154 drug-using homeless youths in Santa Monica, California.

A new study led by researchers from the UCLA School of Nursing has found that nursing intervention can significantly decrease substance abuse among homeless youth. Published in the current issue of the American Journal on Addictions, the research also revealed that ‘art messaging’ can have a positive effect on drug and alcohol abuse and other risky behaviours among this population, writes UCLA's Laura Perry.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Become a donor; save a life.

With National Bandana Day - Friday 12 October 2012 – just around the corner, every South African is encouraged to support those suffering from leukaemia and buy a Sunflower Fund Bandana for only R20. The colourful bandana’s with the word Hope written on them are available from all Pick n Pay stores nationwide as well as Round Table Southern Africa, including Namibia.   Read More...



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